Come Rain or Shine, Why You Always Need an Umbrella

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What is an umbrella policy?  An umbrella policy provides an added layer of liability protection for bodily injury or property damage you cause to others. It is excess insurance over your existing homeowners,
automobile and other personal liability policies.  Umbrella policies provide a minimum of $1,000,000 in coverage with higher limits available.  Premiums are usually
less than $1 a day for a $1,000,000 policy.

Why do I need an umbrella policy?  A personal umbrella policy gives you peace of mind knowing you are protecting your assets.   Sure you have some protection
under your auto and homeowner insurance policies, but that may not be enough.  If someone is seriously injured
because of your negligence, you are going to be sued.  Once that lawsuit is filed, imagine the relief you will feel knowing you have at least a $1,000,000 in coverage. 

Who needs an umbrella policy?  Anyone with existing assets or with future earnings potential. 

Here are just a few situations that increase your liability exposure and warrant an umbrella policy:

  • You have youthful operators driving your family vehicles
  • You have a swimming pool
  • You entertain frequently at your home
  • You own rental property

If you would like addtional information on an umbrella policy, contact us or call our office @ 781-767-3300.

Coming up in our next blog we will give you examples of actual claims that have resulted in judgements in excess of $1,000,000.

 

New Mass. Law requires headlights be on whenever windshield wipers are on

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The Massachusetts legislature has passed a new law (M.G.L.c.85, sec 15) effective April 7, 2015 requiring drivers to turn on their headlights whenever they turn on their windshield wipers.  

WHAT HAPPENS IF YOU DON’T TURN ON THE HEADLIGHTS

Failure to turn your headlights on when your winshield wipers are on can result in a moving violation. The law also states that headlights should be in use 30 minutes before sunrise and sunset or when visibility is under 500 feet.  As a result of the new law, the list of surchargeable incidents has been amended to add these violations.  So if you are stopped and receive a ticket, you will also be charged with a moving violation on your driving record which will in turn increase your insurance premiums. 

So, as soon as you turn on those windshield wipers, be sure your headlights are on too….not only for everyone’s safety but because it is the law.